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Complete Guide to Pink Discharge Before Period: What Every Woman Should Know

Spotting is any light vaginal bleeding that occurs at any time during your menstrual cycle other than during your period. Spotting between periods is reasonably common and occurs in approximately 25-30% of women. Most of the time, the bleeding is caused by embedding of the fertilized egg to the inner wall of the uterus (endometrium). However, pink discharge before period might be triggered by a wide range of conditions such as ectopic pregnancy to miscarriage and vaginal infection.

For women who have never experienced spotting before, this occurrence can be alarming. What does pink mucus discharge mean, and how do you know if it’s normal or not? Keep reading to find out.

What Is Vaginal Spotting?

Vaginal spotting refers to very light bleeding that occurs throughout a woman’s menstrual cycle at any time other than during period. Spotting is oftentimes associated with pink discharge, and usually occurs 2 weeks before period, right when you’re ovulating. This discharge, along with the light bleeding, is part of the ovulatory syndrome and occurs as a result of the ovum traveling from the ruptured follicle to the uterus. Usually, the discharge is accompanied by cramping, breast tenderness and lower back pain.
Vaginal spotting may also occur as the result of the attachment of the fertilized egg to the endometrium. In this case, spotting is referred to as “implantation spotting,” and may last from a few minutes to one or two days. While in both cases (ovulation and pregnancy) light or brownish pink discharge is absolutely normal, it may still be a reason of concern if there is heavy bleeding.

Vaginal spotting may also occur as the result of the attachment of the fertilized egg to the endometrium. In this case, spotting is referred to as “implantation spotting,” and may last from a few minutes to one or two days. While in both cases (ovulation and pregnancy) light or brownish pink discharge is absolutely normal, it may still be a reason of concern if there is heavy bleeding.

Pink Discharge Before Period, a Sign of Pregnancy?

Vaginal discharge is a common sign of early pregnancy. If you experience pink discharge 12 days to one week before period, there is a very good chance that you are pregnant. When the fertilized egg attaches to the blood-filled endometrium, it may hook some blood vessels and cause them to crack, thus resulting in light bleeding and pink discharge. The amount of blood varies from a case to another: while some women experience very light spotting for just a few minutes, others report slightly heavier bleeding that lasts for a few hours or days, which leads them to thinking that their period has just started.

The amount of blood varies from a case to another: while some women experience very light spotting for just a few minutes, others report slightly heavier bleeding that lasts for a few hours or days, which leads them to thinking that their period has just started.

Read also:

What’s With This Pink Discharge? Our Expert Is Answering Your Questions

Pink Discharge During Pregnancy: When Is It Normal & When Not?

Spotting is any light vaginal bleeding that occurs at any time during your menstrual cycle other than during your period. Spotting between periods is reasonably common and occurs in approximately 25-30% of women. Most of the time, the bleeding is caused by embedding of the fertilized egg to the inner wall of the uterus (endometrium). However, pink discharge before period might be triggered by a wide range of conditions such as ectopic pregnancy to miscarriage and vaginal infection.

For women who have never experienced spotting before, this occurrence can be alarming. What does pink mucus discharge mean, and how do you know if it’s normal or not? Keep reading to find out.

What Is Vaginal Spotting?

Vaginal spotting refers to very light bleeding that occurs throughout a woman’s menstrual cycle at any time other than during period. Spotting is oftentimes associated with pink discharge, and usually occurs 2 weeks before period, right when you’re ovulating. This discharge, along with the light bleeding, is part of the ovulatory syndrome and occurs as a result of the ovum traveling from the ruptured follicle to the uterus. Usually, the discharge is accompanied by cramping, breast tenderness and lower back pain.
Vaginal spotting may also occur as the result of the attachment of the fertilized egg to the endometrium. In this case, spotting is referred to as “implantation spotting,” and may last from a few minutes to one or two days. While in both cases (ovulation and pregnancy) light or brownish pink discharge is absolutely normal, it may still be a reason of concern if there is heavy bleeding.

Vaginal spotting may also occur as the result of the attachment of the fertilized egg to the endometrium. In this case, spotting is referred to as “implantation spotting,” and may last from a few minutes to one or two days. While in both cases (ovulation and pregnancy) light or brownish pink discharge is absolutely normal, it may still be a reason of concern if there is heavy bleeding.

Pink Discharge Before Period, a Sign of Pregnancy?

Vaginal discharge is a common sign of early pregnancy. If you experience pink discharge 12 days to one week before period, there is a very good chance that you are pregnant. When the fertilized egg attaches to the blood-filled endometrium, it may hook some blood vessels and cause them to crack, thus resulting in light bleeding and pink discharge. The amount of blood varies from a case to another: while some women experience very light spotting for just a few minutes, others report slightly heavier bleeding that lasts for a few hours or days, which leads them to thinking that their period has just started.

The amount of blood varies from a case to another: while some women experience very light spotting for just a few minutes, others report slightly heavier bleeding that lasts for a few hours or days, which leads them to thinking that their period has just started.

Read also:

What’s With This Pink Discharge? Our Expert Is Answering Your Questions

Pink Discharge During Pregnancy: When Is It Normal & When Not?

What Is the Difference Between Spotting and Period?

Many women experience spotting but no period, but most of them fail to distinguish one from another. The quantity of blood loss is essentially the primary difference between spotting and period. Spotting is usually irregular and light, unlike period which is much heavier in volume. Most women experience just faint staining or streaking in their vaginal mucus, which tends to be either pinkish or brownish in color. Light bleeding may be present at sometimes but not at other times. Spotting is usually more obvious in the morning, after exercise or after intercourse. You will probably notice pink discharge on the toilet paper or underwear.

On the other hand, your period will be much heavier in volume, requiring the use of tampons to absorb the blood and prevent staining your clothing. The amount usually increases during the first two days, then it gradually decreases before it stops altogether. At the same time, the bleeding is likely accompanied by other period-specific symptoms such as cramps, backache, frequent urination, stomach bloating, breast tenderness and constipation.

Consider keeping a spotting diary to help you with recall of dates and where in your cycle the spotting occurs. This will also provide an accurate and objective picture when describing your history of spotting to your gyn.

Pink Discharge After Period, Is It Normal?

If you notice pink vaginal discharge after period ends, this doesn’t necessarily mean that there’s something wrong going on down there. Pink watery discharge may be the result of your vagina flushing out bacteria and blood remnants. If this is the case, the color can range from light pink to dark brown, and consistency may be anywhere from watery to clumpy and pasty. Note that odor might be quite strong and very similar to how your period smells.

However, pink mucus discharge after period may also indicate the presence of an infection. In addition to gray, green or yellow discharge, swelling, redness or itching of the vulva, cramping, burning during urination, lower abdominal (pelvic) pain, bad odor coming from the vagina, and painful intercourse, many vaginal infections may also cause spotting between periods. The amount is usually larger than normal ovulation-related spotting, and the blood tends to be brighter rather than pinkish or brownish.

If you experience any of the symptoms mentioned above, you should call your doctor and have the issue investigated. Most commonly, pink discharge occurring a week after period is caused by sexually transmitted diseases, such as gonorrhea, Chlamydia, trichomoniasis or HPV. If the discharge occurs 2 weeks after period, you may be ovulating (see above).

Read also:

What’s With This Pink Discharge? Our Expert Is Answering Your Questions

Other Causes of Pink Vaginal Discharge

In addition to ovulation, pregnancy and vaginal infections, there are a few other causes that may lead to pink vaginal discharge. Spotting is common in case of ectopic pregnancy, a condition in which the egg attaches to either the cervix or fallopian tube instead of the endometrium. It causes light pink discharge, late or missed period and negative pregnancy tests.

If you have miscarried, you may also exhibit heavy vaginal bleeding with clots, back pain, uterine cramping and lower abdominal pain. Have a medical checkup as soon as possible if you are (or suspect that you are) pregnant. You may need to have an ultrasound to see if the embryo is still present and viable and if heartbeat is present. Products of conception in the uterus after a miscarriage may cause infection and continual bleeding, and you must have a curette (scrapping of the uterine wall) to remove them.

Other causes of pink discharge include:

  • post coital bleeding (after sex). It usually happens due to blood vessels in the cervix becoming engorged with blood during early pregnancy, which makes them more likely to be irritated and bleed;
  • contraceptive (birth control) pills, patches and hormonal-based devices (breakthrough bleeding);
  • hormonal imbalance caused by thyroid or ovarian problems;
  • blood thinning medications (e.g. aspirin, heparin, warfarin)ж
  • side effects due to anti-depressant and corticosteroids (anti-inflammatory) drugs;
  • uterine, cervical or ovarian cancer, endometriosis, lesions, polyps or fibroids (rarely);
  • polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (POS);
  • vaginal examination such as having a pap smear;
  • ongoing stress.
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